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Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

2 edition of Diurnal bird use of snags on clearcuts in central coastal Oregon found in the catalog.

Diurnal bird use of snags on clearcuts in central coastal Oregon

Barry Schreiber

Diurnal bird use of snags on clearcuts in central coastal Oregon

by Barry Schreiber

  • 238 Want to read
  • 29 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Birds -- Breeding.,
  • Clearcutting -- Environmental aspects.,
  • Nest building.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Barry Schreiber.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination63 leaves, bound :
    Number of Pages63
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14314292M

    home range. Hence, we used radio telemetry to determine home ranges (n = 11) and habitat use (n = 14) of pileated woodpeckers in the Coast Ranges of western Oregon during the summers of Home ranges for individual adult birds, after young had fledged, averaged ha. . Some foresters are now using tags to protect the more suitable snags from fuelwood cutters in high-use areas. In this book, we have summarized both published data and personal observations on the cavity-nesting birds of North America in an attempt to provide land managers with an up-to-date, convenient source of information on the specific.

    Morrison, M.L. Influence of sample size on discriminant function analysis of habitat use by birds. Journal of Field Ornithology 55(3): Morrison, M.L. and E.C. Meslow. Avifauna associated with early growth vegetation on clearcuts in the Oregon Coast Ranges. Research Paper PNW, USDA Forest Service, Portland, OR. Snags and logs are important structural features of old-growth forests in providing wildlife habitat (Maser et al. ; Thomas et al. ; Harmon et al. ~. In the Blue Mountains, for example, 39 bird and 23 mammal species use snags, and vertebrate species make at least some use of down wood (Thomas et al. ; Maser et al. ~.

    B. Schreiber and D. S. deCalesta, “The relationship between cavity-nesting birds and snags on clearcuts in western Oregon,” Forest Ecology and Management, vol. 50, no. , pp. –, View at: Google Scholar. examines complex forest issues and provides a broad overview on a variety of topics. Of course, sometimes people just have questions about the basics. Below is a list of the questions and answers that have been asked by users like you, who want to know more about Oregon’s forests and forestry. These questions were posed to and answered by working foresters.


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Diurnal bird use of snags on clearcuts in central coastal Oregon by Barry Schreiber Download PDF EPUB FB2

Diurnal Bird Use of Snags on Clearcuts in Central Coastal Oregon INTRODUCTION Snags (partially live or dead standing trees) meet a variety of wildlife requirements. Predominant among these is use as nest sites by cavity-nesting birds. There are twenty-four species of cavity nesting birds breeding in the Oregon Coast Ranges (Phillips ).

The effect of snag retention on clearcuts on breeding bird populations was evaluated in the Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) dominated forest in central coastal Oregon.

Diurnal bird species on 14 clearcut sites (Cited by: 4. Schreiber, B. and decalesta, D.S., The relationship between cavity-nesting birds and snags on clearcuts in western Oregon. For. Ecol. Manage., Relationships between cavity-nesting birds (CNB) and density and characteristics of snags were investigated on 13 clearcuts in central coastal Oregon.

Relationships between cavity-nesting birds (CNB) and density and characteristics of snags were investigated on 13 clearcuts in central coastal Oregon.

Species richness and density of CNB were positively (P snag density and were still increasing at the maximum snag density by: Diurnal use of snags on clearcuts in central coastal Oregon.

for cavity-nesting birds. Studies explicitly linking snag size and density to demography of cavity-nesting birds are badly needed. For example, the physical characteristics (e.g., age, decay class) of snags influence use by cavity-dependent wildlife in recent clearcuts (e.g., Hallett et al.,Brandeis et al.,Walter and Maguire,Arnett et al.,Kroll et al., a) and wildlife use of downed wood in clearcuts varies by size and decay class (McComb and.

The intent of the model is to update and replace existing snag-wildlife models in Washington and Oregon. Whereas the relationship of dead and decaying wood to wildlife habitat is a major component of the model, DecAID will also provide expert advice on prescribing and interpreting conditions of dead wood for wildland and prescribed fire and.

Molly E. McDermott, Petra Bohall Wood, Short- and long-term implications of clearcut and two-age silviculture for conservation of breeding forest birds in the central Appalachians, USA, Biological Conservation, /,1, (), ().

For example, the physical characteristics (e.g., age, decay class) of snags influence use by cavity-dependent wildlife in recent clearcuts (e.g., Hallett et al., ;Brandeis et al., ;Walter. Density of small snags (– cm DBH) mirrored residual basal area, with controls and group-selection stands having the greatest snag densities.

Creation of snags in clearcuts by injection with herbicides caused initial snag density in these areas to be greater than other treatments, but density in clearcuts declined sharply by 6 years.

In the central Cascades, fire-hollowed western redcedar may provide relatively rare but uniquely beneficial habitat for long-legged myotis (Ormsbee ). In northeastern Oregon, black bears and American martins use large-diameter hollow trees and logs of grand fir and western larch (Bull et al.

a; Bull et al. of breeding and winter birds in commercially thinned and unthinned Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) stands from May to June old stands in The study was conducted in to year-the Central Oregon Coast Ranges and the Tillamook State Forest.

Total abundance and species diversity of breeding birds was greater in thinned stands. 11 soft snags (≥15 years)/ha: Raphael & White Coniferous (Oregon) ≥28 cm, hardness 3–4 = 19– years after death of tree; stage definitions from Cline, Berg, and Wight, only for clearcuts (dead trees) ≥14 soft snags (≥19 years)/ha with bark cover ≥10%.

Walter S.T. & Maguire C.C. () Snags, cavity-nesting birds, and silvicultural treatments in western Oregon. The Journal of Wildlife Management, 69, ; Heltzel J.M. & Leberg P.L. () Effects of selective logging on breeding bird communities in bottomland hardwood forests in Louisiana.

Journal of Wildlife Management, 70, densities (by size class, decay class etc.) in 18 3 to 5 year-old clearcuts in the Oregon Cascades. Assess the relationship between snag densities (by stand condition) and cavity-nesting bird abundance over 10 watersheds ( acres each) in the Oregon Coast Range.

Retain a range of hard to soft snags because different wildlife species use different decay stages to meet different life history needs. For example, Aubry and Raley () found strong differences in decay characteristics between nest trees and roost trees used by pileated woodpeckers, with nest snags tending to be harder than roost snags.

Biodiversity of diurnal breeding bird communities related to succession in the dry Douglas-fir forests of southeastern British Columbia.

Canadian Journal of Forest Research. [] Scott, Virgil E. Characteristics of ponderosa pine snags used by cavity nesting birds in Arizona. Traveling across the state, you soon discover that Oregon is home to a wide range of trees.

There are 30 native coniferous species and 37 native species of broadleaf trees. Oregon varies greatly in terms of elevation, temperature, wind, rainfall and soil composition. Combinations of all these factors help determine the dominant tree species of an area.

Characteristics of snags used by secondary cavity nesters including western bluebirds in western Oregon Douglas-fir are as follows: average diameter 28 inches ( cm), range of diameters 10 to 54 inches ( cm); average height of snags feet ( m), range of heights 12 to 55 feet ( m); average bark cover 16 percent, range.

In harvested landscapes, the retention of riparian buffers along streams may mitigate the effects of habitat loss and fragmentation by providing usable habitat for songbirds. To explore this hypothesis, I studied the influence of riparian buffer width on breeding songbirds and forest structure in a high elevation forest of south-central British Columbia.

I studied four different buffer widths. We captured and processed Humboldt martens in the Central Coast using methods described in Mortenson and Moriarty, which were approved by the USDA Forest Service’s Institute for Animal Care and Use Committee (USFS –) with an Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Scientific Take Permit (–15).

We captured spotted owls and.Schreiber, B.; DeCalesta, D. S. The relationship between cavity-nesting birds and snags on clearcuts in western Oregon. Forest Ecology and Management. cavity-nesting birds and snags on clearcuts in western Oregon. Forest Ecology and Management. Gopher snakes are common nestbox predators in central coastal.density of snags/ha in all but control stands (Cham-bers et al.

). Bird sampling We sampled diurnal breeding birds one year prior to harvest and for two years after harvest on all replicates. Birds were sampled from early May through mid-Julyusing the modified variable circular-plot (VCP) method described by Reynolds et al.